IMPRS IU Summer Opportunities List

Clinical Research Opportunities

Clinical research is a branch of health care science that determines the safety and effectiveness (efficacy) of medications, devices, diagnostic products and treatment regimens intended for human use. These may be used for prevention, treatment, diagnosis or for relieving symptoms of a disease.

Department of Emergency Medicine

Program Overview

The IU School of Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine offers up to eight summer research opportunities for student in the summer between the first and second year of the medical curriculum. The purpose of this program is to provide a structured environment that engages and cultivates medical students’ interest, experience, and training in performing emergency medicine clinical research.

Research

Students will engage in a mentored emergency medicine clinical research experience. The program is designed to: 1) increase student awareness in the value of doing clinical research; and 2) strongly support students interested in academic emergency medicine. Students will have the opportunity to work in a busy, high-volume emergency department (ED) either at IUH Methodist, IUH Riley Hospital for Children, and/or Eskenazi Health Hospital.

Activities

In addition to a hands-on clinical research experience, program participants will be actively involved in a weekly data/journal club as well as research training in the principles of study enrollment, informed consent, study design, data management, and various other research methodologies.

Eligibility

Medical students in good standing who will have completed their first year (M1) by the summer program onset are eligible to apply. Each accepted student will be paired with a highly qualified faculty mentor for the 10-week summer research program.

The program is only available in the Indianapolis area. Applicants must be willing to work rotating shifts (including overnight shifts) in the clinical environment. Weekend shifts will be expected. Emergency Departments operate 24/7/365, so there will be opportunities every day to engage in research and experiential learning.

Outcomes

At the end of the 10 weeks, each participant will submit an abstract to and present a poster at an IU School of Medicine IMPRS Poster Session on July 26, 2019. It is also likely that the culmination of the research project will be included in a manuscript and/or presentation at a national meeting and that the student will have co-authorship on the published work.

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Department of Emergency Medicine program, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information

For additional information about the program or mentors, please contact Dr. Lane Coffee at rlcoffee@iu.edu or imprs@iupui.eduPlease do not directly email the Department of Emergency Medicine mentors.

Student Research Program in Radiology Research

Program Overview

The IU School of Medicine Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences offers up to 6 summer research opportunities for first year medical students.  Research opportunities are available in the general areas of biomedical imaging technology development, computational and quantitative imaging, radiopharmaceutical sciences, bioprinting, diagnostic imaging, structural and functional neuroimaging in clinical populations, and interventional radiology.  First-year medical students who are interested in the program are encouraged to review the Radiology and Imaging Sciences research project opportunity website (link) to explore currently available projects and contact mentors for discussion and development and submission of a 300-word research proposal (deadline is April 15).

Proposed will be reviewed by the Radiology Project Development Team (Rad-PDT) and the most meritorious applications will be funded.

IU School of Medicine provides faculty and students an ideal environment for medical education and research to achieve major advancements in medicine.

Structure of Internship

Medical students participating in the SRP in Radiology Research will spend 10 weeks working on a research project under the guidance of IUSM Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences research mentors as well as attending weekly seminars addressing responsible conduct of research, scientific rigor, and career development. At the end of the program, all students present their work in the IMPRS Poster Session.

Some IMPRS programs may require additional time and effort from participants beyond the fixed dates listed in the time line. Students will be notified in advance and compensated for this additional effort. Flexibility in these specific research programs will be offered to ensure that students can remain focused on their academic requirements and career advancement.

Medical students are encouraged to consider participating in this program as a launching pad for other biomedical research opportunities (e.g., MedSTAR, NIH MSRP, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship and Doris Duke Research Programs) as they develop into physician scientists within their IUSM medical education and beyond. A goal for IMPRS is that the students who participate in this program would decide to continue to be involved in research with their summer mentor throughout their medical education. Questions about this option, please discuss with your mentor and reach out to either Dr. Brittney-Shea Herbert or Anne Nguyen by email.

Application Process

Students are encouraged to identify and meet with participating faculty mentors so that they can indicate their specific research mentor preference on their application. Qualified applicants who do not list a preferred research mentor or who identify research mentors with no available lab openings will be assigned to a research mentor that as closely as possible aligns with the student’s research interests.

For a list of participating faculty research mentors and a brief description of their research interests, please follow the link: Research Mentors. If you need to find a faculty mentor who has research in your area of interest, go to the IUSM ReSEARCH Connect database.

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the SRP in Radiology Research program, fill out the RedCap application form.

Faculty Mentors

Faculty Mentor Research Interest Projects
Monica Forbes-Amrhein, MD, PhD Fetal, Pediatric and Musculoskeletal Imaging Advanced ultrasound imaging of the brain in neonatal hydrocephalus; Costochondral junction fractures; Skull radiographs in skeletal surveys; Prenatal MRI findings in patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome
Karmen K. Yoder, PhD The role of dopamine in cognition and behavior; factors that affect in vivodopamine tone; neuroinflammation; alcohol and substance use disorders; chronic pain disorders; traumatic brain injury; neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias Neuroimaging of the chemistry, function, and structure of psychiatric and neurological disorders; Primary PET Interest:  Relative changes in brain dopamine; Multi-modality Interests (Interaction of smoking and drinking on brain structure and function:   How rs-fMRI, DTI, and MRS inform how the dopaminergic system is regulated in humans; How dopaminergic function interacts with BOLD response to a working memory task
Rupa Radhakrishnan, MBBS, MS Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Functional/Structural brain connectivity on MRI in infants exposed to opioids/ neonatal abstinence syndrome; Cerebral perfusion in preterm infants in preeclampsia; Ultrasound Elastography to assess brain tissue stiffness and brain injury in neonatal hydrocephalus
Yu-Chien Wu, MD, PhD, ABMP To understand diffusion physics in biological systems and utilize diffusion MRI to elucidate disease mechanisms, facilitate early diagnoses, and identify optimal treatments. Research projects-Alzheimer’s disease 

-Mild traumatic brain imaging

-Sports-related concussion

-Neurodegenerative diseases

Leaning objectives for students

-Neuroimaging data processing pipelines

-Image data processing software tools

-Regions-of-interest analyses

-Voxel-based analyses

-Diffusion imaging and functional imaging computations

Literature reviews

Qi-Huang Zheng, PhD Radiochemistry PET radiotracer development and production/design, synthesis and biological evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for use in the biomedical/molecular imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET) to study cancer, neuroscience and cardiovascular diseases.
Taeho Jo, PhD MRI and PET Improved accuracy of MRI-based classification of alzheimer’s disease by incorporating genetic information in deep learning; Multimodal and multiscale deep learning for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease using structural MRI and PET images.
Brenna C. McDonald, PsyD Structural and functional MRI in human clinical populations Studies of cognitive function in children and adults after traumatic brain injury and cancer treatment, functional MRI for surgical applications
Lester Smith, PhD Bioprinting; biofabrication; tissue engineering; bioreactor development Comprehensive biofabrication platform (bioprinting, bioreactor culture, analysis); automated and high output methods; bioprinted tissue metabolism; tissue perfusion: computational fluid dynamics analysis
Paul R. Territo, PhD Development of translational imaging biomarkers for the assessment of disease progression and therapeutic response. Tracer Development and Validation Projects; Image and Data Analysis; Preclinical Imaging; and Clinical Imaging Projects
Gary D. Hutchins, PhD Quantitative in-vivo imaging Imaging method development and validation.-Instrumentation 

-Image Processing

-Tracer Kinetic Modeling

-Parameter Imaging

-3D Image Display

Imaging Methods (PET, MRI, CT)

-Whole Body Perfusion

-Substrate Utilization

-Molecular Imaging

Application Areas

-Cancer

-Cardiovascular

–          Renal

-Neuroscience

Contact Information

For additional information about the program or mentors, please contact  imprs@iupui.edu.

IU School of Medicine-Evansville Academic Medicine Internship

Program Overview

IU School of Medicine-Evansville has a neuroscience internship for summer 2019. The program is designed for first-year students wishing to explore imaging-based research and/or pediatric brain development.

Structure of Internship

Interns will work with faculty mentor at IU School of Medicine-Evansville for a duration of 10 weeks involved in data summarization and analysis, literature review, generating graphical display of results, and drawing conclusions. There will be opportunities for presentation and publication with involvement extending beyond summer 2019.

Financial Support

A total stipend of $5000 for ten weeks.

Faculty/Mentor and Research Project

Kara Garcia, PhD, Visiting Assistant Research Professor of Anatomy & Cell Biology

Project Title

Quantifying Cortical Growth during Pediatric Brain Development from Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Description

Abnormal brain structure has been linked to neurological disorders including autism, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. While magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information on brain structure at a given time point, measuring brain growth (change in brain structure between time points) presents unique challenges. Consequently, many studies have focused on coarse or global measures of brain growth, despite evidence that brain development is highly dynamic and non-uniform.

The Garcia lab uses mechanical theory and automated methods to precisely measure growth across the developing brain. Using de-identified, longitudinal MRI data over a range of pediatric ages, this study will (1) assess 3D brain reconstruction quality using common neuroimaging research software, (2) compute individualized growth maps for de-identified subjects, and (3) use statistical analysis to assess spatial and temporal differences in brain growth. Students will gain a deep understanding of cortical anatomy, brain development, and common tools in brain mapping research. Preference will be given to applicants proficient in shell script, Matlab and/or C++.

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for The Garcia Lab, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information

Kara Garcia, PhD
Visiting Assistant Research Professor of Anatomy & Cell Biology
Indiana University School of Medicine-Evansville
Office: (812) 909-7230
karagarc@iu.edu

Student Research Fellowship Program (SRFP) at IU School of Medicine-Fort Wayne

Program Overview:

The Student Research Fellowship is a structured program developed to provide students with basic research skills and practical experience in conducting research independently. Registration and detailed information about the 2019 summer program will be announced in December 2018.

Student Eligibility:

First-and second-year students enrolled in an accredited program (DO or MD) are eligible to apply to this program. These students will be expected to work independently and should expect to spend approximately 40 hours per week committed to the research project for 10 weeks.

Application Process:

To apply for Student Research Fellowship Program, applicants must complete and submit the SRFP application by 5 pm on February 1, 2019. Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. One letter must be from a faculty member at the school in which the applicant is attending. The application form and each letter of recommendation must be submitted directly at serf@iu.edu.  For more details about the Student Research Fellowship Program, call the IU School of Medicine-Fort Wayne office at 260-481-6730 or Gina Bailey, IU School of Medicine, at 260-481-6731. Students will be notified of acceptance into the program by February 28, 2019.

Contact Information:

For additional information about the Student Research Fellowship Program, please contact Luna Wahab from IU School of Medicine in Fort Wayne at lwahab@iu.edu.

Emergency Room Experiential Opportunity at IU School of Medicine-West Lafayette

Program Overview

The Emergency Room Experiential Opportunity is an 8-week program to provide the students an opportunity in the Physician shadowing program in the Emergency Medicine Department of Greater Lafayette hospitals.

Student Eligibility

Only first year IU School of Medicine-West Lafayette students are eligible to apply to this program. West Lafayette campus students are provided application materials in November with a due date of January 11, 2019. 

Contact Information

For additional information, please contact Dr. Ray Munguia at rmunguia@purdue.edu.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Program Overview

As a part of the Indiana Medical Student Program for Research and Scholarship (IMPRS), the Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology is delighted to offer up to ten 2019 summer research opportunities for Indiana University School of Medicine medical students completing their first year of training. Our division, one of the largest in the country, firmly believes in the early promotion of clinical and translational research exposure among medical trainees. This first step in the development of a working scientific skillset is applicable in any future medical career and is a critical instrument for the next generation physician. Execution of the IMPRS program within the Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology will provide a structured ten-week summer experience aimed to develop basic research skills and knowledge within clinical and translational investigation focused in gastroenterology or hepatology. The long-term goal of this program is to increase medical student exposure and experience to research methods, foster scientific intrigue, and nurture hypothesis-driven investigation beyond the traditional medical education program.

Research

Students will be paired with highly selected and experienced research mentors, all with active research programs in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Our faculty has an extensive track record in research productivity, as evident by more than 150 publications in the year 2018 alone. Research projects will be individually developed to overlap the research mentor expertise as well as the student’s scientific interest, prior experience, and future career goals. Resultant project data will be compiled, analyzed, and interpreted in conjunction with the research mentor. In addition to project activity, each student will attend a series of weekly seminars and participate in the poster session at the end of the summer session on July 26, 2019. The research poster session will allow the student an opportunity to present their project background, aims, methods, results, and conclusions. The posters will be judged and twenty projects will be selected to compete for awards in the oral presentation on July 31, 2019.

Eligibility

Medical students in good standing who will have completed their first year by the summer program onset are eligible to apply. Each accepted student will be paired with a highly qualified faculty mentor for the 10-week summer research program.  This program is only available in the Indianapolis area.

Outcome of Research Projects:

IMPRS participants within the Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology will be expected to submit a research abstract and participate in the poster session at the end of the summer session. Further, it should be expected that the research contribution of the trainee to be included in a submitted manuscript or presented at a national gastroenterology or hepatology meeting. The research student will have co-authorship on any published work arising from the research program.

Faculty Research Mentors

Hepatology
Mentors: Drs. Chalasani, Vuppalanchi, Ghabril, Gawrieh, Liang, Orman, Nephew, Desai, Patidar & Lammert

Our hepatology faculty represent a spectrum of thought leaders and internationally known physicians with highly active clinical-research careers. We can support research within a diverse realm of liver diseases in both pre- and post-transplant patients. Available mentors are supported by a number of federal grant mechanisms, supporting investigation dedicated to alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), HIV in NAFLD, inpatient liver-related outcomes, and autoimmune hepatitis. Beyond these dedicated grants, we have robust, ongoing investigator-initiated clinical research within noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis, autoimmune liver disease, drug-induced liver injury, and even applications within social media. A lab-based hepatology experience is also available with Dr. Liang, an experienced scientist with expertise in molecular biology and genetics. Beyond working with the research mentor, the paired students within the hepatology tract will also work closely with the hepatology research team and participate in weekly Monday research meetings.

Hepatobiliary Basic Science Research
Mentors: Drs. Liangpunsakul, Francis, Alpini

The hepatobiliary research group is composed of world-renowned leaders in biliary and hepatocyte biology.  We study the mechanism and pathophysiology of chronic cholestatic liver diseases such as alcohol-induced liver injury and biliary diseases (cholangiopathies).  Our research group also focuses on the regulation of biliary proliferation/damage during cholangiopathies and the role of mast cells in chronic liver diseases.  We employ in vitro and in vivo models as well as human subject samples for our studies.  Our group is supported by NIAAA, NIDDK as well as VA merit awards.  All available mentors have extensive experience in mentorship and track record with students.  The candidates should have some background experiences in basic molecular biology techniques.    

Gastroenterology

Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Clostridium Difficile Infection
Mentors: Drs. Fischer, Sagi, Bohm

Dr. Fischer is a national leader in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and spearheads the IBD program at IU. She is recognized for her work with the IBD clinical trials program and the development of the fecal microbial transplantation program for the treatment of clostridium difficile infection among other conditions. Drs. Bohm and Sagi, both with experience in clinical investigation, are also closely tied to the IBD clinical trials program at IU.

Neurogastroenterology and Motility
Mentors: Drs. Wo, Nowak, Siwiec & Shin

Drs. Wo and Nowak lead the IU motility group and have far reaching recognition for their expertise and contributions in gut dysmotility and associated disorders. Alongside leaders at Purdue University, Dr. Nowak is also a coinvestigator with a NIH innovation grant examining therapeutics in the realm of electroceuticals for gut dysmotility. Dr. Shin is promising clinician scientist and her research focus is on the effects of bile acids and microbiome in irritable bowel syndrome.

Medical Informatics in Gastroenterology
Mentor: Dr. Imler

Dr. Imler is a gastroenterologist but also the Director of the Data Core for the Regenstrief Institute. This world renowned center, key in many high impact publications, is a central resource for electronic healthcare data access for both the Regenstrief Institute and IU. Dr. Imler has extensive experience in the implementation of medical informatics (application of the Data Core) in clinical investigation focused in gastroenterology.

Endoscopic
Mentors: Drs. Rex, Dewitt, Al Haddad
Beyond being the active Chief of GI Endoscopy at IU, he is a master clinician and an internationally known gastroenterologist with an extensive track in record in education, endoscopic tool development, and research within multiple aspects of colonoscopy.

Advanced Endoscopy
Mentors: Drs. Sherman, Fogel, Easler, Al Haddad, Dewitt

The advanced endoscopy faculty at IU are internationally recognized authorities (icons) in therapeutic ERCP and EUS for a multitude of pancreaticobiliary conditions. The group is well-represented in many facets of scientific investigation that include all aspects of ERCP and EUS and new endoscopic device and technology. Further, Dr. Fogel is a part of the Consortium to Study Chronic Pancreatitis, Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Centers (CPDPC). The CPDPC is a large, federally funded multi-collaborator grant tasked with elucidating the relationship between chronic pancreatitis, pancreatogenic diabetes, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

Application

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology program, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information

Questions about the Faculty or possible projects/research experiences should be directed to Craig Lammert, MD by email.

Department of Pediatrics

Program Overview

The IUSM Department of Pediatrics offers summer research opportunities for rising MS2 medical students.  The purpose of the program is to provide a structured environment that engages and cultivates medical students’ interest, experience, and training in performing pediatric clinical research.

Research

Students will engage in a mentored pediatric research experience. The program is designed to: 1) increase student awareness in the value of doing clinical/translational research; and 2) strongly support students interested in pediatrics.  Students will have the opportunity to work with a mentor in the department on a mutually-agreed upon project.

Activities

In addition to a hands-on clinical research experience, program participants will be actively involved in research meetings as well as research training in the principles of study enrollment, informed consent, study design, data management, and various other research methodologies.

Eligibility

Medical students in good standing who will have completed their first year (MS1) by the summer program onset are eligible to apply.  Each accepted student will be paired with a highly qualified faculty mentor for the 10-week summer research program.

The program is only available in the Indianapolis area.

Outcomes

At the end of the 10 weeks, each participant will submit an abstract to and present a poster at an IUSM IMPRS Poster Session on July 26, 2019.  It is also likely that the culmination of the research project will be included in a manuscript and/or presentation at a national meeting and that the student will have co-authorship on the published work. 

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Department of Pediatrics program, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Faculty Mentors

Adolescent Medicine: Matthew Aalsma, PhD
Dr. Aalsma focuses his research on improving the identification of behavioral health care needs and access and utilization of behavioral health services for adolescents. Students working with Dr. Aalsma would participate in gathering community-based survey and interview data for an on-going implementation trial to improve substance use screening and interventions for justice involved adolescents. https://medicine.iu.edu/faculty/2683/aalsma-matthew/

Type 1 Diabetes: Linda DiMeglio, MD, MPH
Dr. DiMeglio is a national leader in Type 1 Diabetes research and leads a clinical and translational research program focused on the prevention of Type 1 Diabetes, preserving insulin production in persons with newly diagnosed diabetes, and advancing care of persons with established disease through technology and therapeutics.  Students working with her will engage inaspects of these projects, including observing participant visits and assisting with data collection.  https://medicine.iu.edu/faculty/1595/dimeglio-linda/

Endocrinology: Tamara S. Hannon, MD
Dr. Hannon is a national leader in childhood obesity and the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes in youth.  Her research program involves primary and secondary prevention of type 2 diabetes, and the development of interventions to improve self-care in adolescents with obesity, prediabetes, and diabetes.  Her mission is to translate diabetes prevention programs using community engagement methods so that they can be utilized in community settings with underserved populations. Students working with her will participate in community-engaged and patient-engaged research, including study recruitment, implementation of prevention programs, and data analysis. https://medicine.iu.edu/faculty/4874/hannon-tamara/

Pulmonary: Kirsten Kloepfer, MD, MS
Dr. Kloepfer’s research focuses on the development of the upper airway microbiome and its association with local inflammatory cytokine expression and airway obstruction. Students working with her will participate in all aspects of her study, including interacting with study participants, and learning how to process samples in her laboratory. https://medicine.iu.edu/faculty/22419/kloepfer-kirsten/

Global Health: Megan McHenry, MD, MS
Dr. McHenry is a global health services researcher and leads a research team within IU and Moi University’s AMPATH partnership in western Kenya. Her work is focused on neurodevelopment in children born to HIV-infected mothers. Students working with her will engage in studies measuring neurodevelopment in young Kenyan children and evaluating an intervention to support children with neurodevelopmental delays. Work may be performed in Indiana or Kenya. https://medicine.iu.edu/faculty/16185/mchenry-megan/

Cardiology: John J. Parent, MD
Dr. Parent specializes in pediatric heart failure, cardiomyopathy and heart transplant. His research focuses on novel gene identification for various types of cardiomyopathy, with a particular focus on left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Students working with him would be assisting in evaluation of clinical and research based genetic testing for cardiomyopathy.

Oncology: Jamie Renbarger, MD, MS
Dr. Renberger is a national leader in oncology research and is leading a program examining the effects of a customized care program in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphocytic leukemia.  Students working with her will work on an ongoing research project examining the impact of personalized exercise on neuropathy, physical functioning, and quality of life/cognitive measures. https://medicine.iu.edu/faculty/6480/renbarger-jamie/

Critical Care: Courtney Rowan, MD, MS
Dr. Rowan is an emerging national leader in respiratory failure research, particularly in the immunocompromised child.  She is actively involved and is leading multicenter database investigating respiratory support modalities in the pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant patient.  Students working with her will work on a research project investigating respiratory failure in a subset of critically ill children.  https://medicine.iu.edu/faculty/12025/rowan-courtney/

Pulmonology: Robert Tepper, MD, PhD
Dr. Tepper received MD PhD degrees and pediatric training at the University of Wisconsin, followed by subspecialty training in pediatric pulmonology at the University of Arizona. His long-term research goals have been to understand the growth and development of the lung early in life both under normal and pathologic conditions. The effects upon lung growth and development of premature birth and the fetal environment (preeclampsia, maternal smoking, and chronic hypoxia) have been important areas of research. Our infant pulmonary function laboratory has the unique ability to assess pulmonary pathophysiology using methodologies that we have developed. Students can observe study visits, infant pulmonary function testing, and assist with data collection and analysis.

Contact Information

For additional information about the program or mentors, please contact  imprs@iupui.edu.

IU School of Medicine Cardiovascular Surgery Summer Research

Program Overview 

To provide medical students an educational experience and introduction to conducting clinical research projects related to adult cardiovascular surgery. 

Structure of Internship 

The summer research will be based at the IU Methodist Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Clinical Outcomes Research Program office. The primary faculty lead and sponsor for the summer research will be Dr. Lawrence Lee. The student will be embedded as a full member of the research program and will work closely with the program coordinator and IU CV surgery faculty. The student’s responsibilities will include participation in regular research group meetings, performing data extraction and basic data analysis, and contributing to manuscript preparation. The student will be expected to work on a poster and at least one manuscript during the 10-week summer program, ideally leading to authorship on a publication. The student will engage in educational mini-lectures given by faculty on topics related to cardiovascular surgery as well as fundamentals of biostatistics. There will be opportunities for the student to observe clinical cases depending on the interests and desire. 

Eligibility

Medical students in good standing who will have completed their first year (MS1) by the summer program onset are eligible to apply.   

The program is only available in the Indianapolis area.   

Outcomes

At the end of the 10 weeks, each participant will submit an abstract to and present a poster at an IUSM IMPRS Poster Session on July 26, 2019.  It is also likely that the culmination of the research project will be included in a manuscript and/or presentation at a national meeting and that the student will have co-authorship on the published work.  

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Cardiovascular Surgery Summer Research program, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review. 

Summer Internship in Medical Simulation

Program Overview

This unpaid 6-week summer internship in medical simulation provides unparalleled access to expert educators and residents from numerous specialties. Summer interns will participate in the setup and breakdown of the simulation lab and observe the facilitation and debriefing in high-fidelity simulations. Interns will work closely with the simulation fellows and simulation faculty on a simulation case to be completed and submitted by the end of the summer internship for publication. At the completion of the internship, students will gain valuable experience on crisis resource management, leadership, communication, procedural training, and be a co-author on a simulation case submitted for publication. This experience is open to 2 medical students, between the first and second year of medical school.

Structure of Internship and Outcomes (include duration)

June 25th to July 31st, 2019. Approximately 30 hours a week Monday through Friday.

Faculty/Mentor and Research Project

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Rami Ahmed, Simulation Fellowship Director; Dr. Dylan Cooper, Simulation Center Director; Dr. Lauren Falvo, Simulation Fellow; Dr. Anna Bona, Simulation Fellow.

Research Project:

Simulation case/technical report to be submitted to peer-reviewed journal by end of internship (July 31st).

Financial Support

No financial support is provided for this experience.

Application Process:

Applications are due on March 30, 2019. Application materials to submit:

  1. CV
  2. Personal statement (300 words or less) of interest in the position (2 total positions for summer of 2019).

Applicants with previous experience in research is a plus but not mandatory.

To apply fill out the RedCap Application Form

Contact Information: For additional information about the opportunity, please email raaahmed@iu.edu

Community Health Partnership and Education

In Community Health Partnership and Education, teams of community and university partners work together to address issues affecting the wellbeing of the community as well as connect the community with science and medicine.

AHEC Summer Observership

Program Overview

The AHEC Primary Care Summer Observership offers first-year IU School of Medicine medical students four and eight-week preclinical primary care opportunities across the state. These experiences give students a deeper understanding of rural and urban health care, caring for underserved populations, the importance of safety-net organizations and the challenges and rewards of this work and setting.

The AHEC Primary Care Summer Observership pays a stipend of $1500 for a 4-week experience and $3000 for an 8-week experience. Applicants should indicate on the application cover page their preference for either a 4-week or 8-week experience with the understanding that these are only preferences.

Applicants must have their own transportation and housing in the area/s where they apply. Housing is not provided. Applicants should indicate on the application cover page those counties that would be within driving distance given his/her housing situation.

This is a competitive application process with selection based on experience, interest in underserved populations, and flexibility in placement location.

Student Observership Student Experience

Participants in the AHEC Primary Care Summer Observership will:

  1. Observe primary care physicians and other health care clinicians caring for rural or urban medically underserved populations.
  2. Explore the network of community social service agencies that complement the work of primary care physicians in rural and urban settings.
  3. Design and develop a project to improve patient education in the clinical setting.

Three days per week will be spent with primary care providers in an ambulatory setting to a) learn the role of the primary care physicians and interdisciplinary teams as providers of health care in medically underserved settings; b) observe dynamics of doctor-patient relationship and workings of interprofessional teams; and c) gain practical experience on how to elicit a patient history and gain basic understanding of the physical examination.

One day per week students will explore the network of community social service agencies that complement the work of primary care physicians in rural and urban settings. Students will become aware of the various safety net providers through site visits and interviews. It is the student’s responsibility to identify and contact agencies.

One day per week students will identify, define, research and develop a patient education project that can be delivered and implemented in the clinic setting. Once completed, students will create a poster detailing selected intervention. It is the student’s responsibility to develop and complete the project.

Application Process:

The application deadline for the AHEC Summer Observership is January 28, 2019. To apply for the AHEC Summer Observership, fill out the RedCap application form. The form will allow you to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information:

For additional information about the program, please contact ahec@iupui.edu.

Community Health Partnership

Program Overview

The Medical Student Internship Program with Community Health Partnerships is designed to give medical students an opportunity to work in community-engaged research. The program will explore the benefits of partnering with patients and community organizations to address pressing health research questions. This program will help students understand the variety of methods and tools used in community-engaged research and will allow them to apply those tools to a practicum project. Projects may include working with a patient focus group, studying a clinic work-flow in partnership with clinic staff, co-creating recruitment or dissemination strategies with community stakeholders, empowering citizen scientists to take part in home-based studies, or working with families on a health intervention study.

Community Health Partnerships is a program of the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI) which was founded in 2008 and currently represents a partnership network of over 600 stakeholders statewide. The program’s mission is to improve the health of Indiana residents through community-university partnerships. We believe it takes both research and community to understand what health improvement looks like and how it can be made a reality.

It is critically important for medical students interested in research to understand the value of partnering with community and patients in addressing our greatest health challenges such as health justice and equity. Partnering with communities and patients requires specific tools and approaches to create novel and sustainable solutions to these challenges. Medical professionals are critically important stakeholders to be a part of, and possibly, lead this charge.

Structure of Internship

Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty/research project availability. Community Health Partnerships will partner students with faculty across the state affiliated with the IU School of Medicine, IU Bloomington and Fairbanks Schools of Public Health and other allied health sciences faculty at IU campuses, Purdue University and University of Notre Dame.

Interns will be expected to dedicate a minimum of 8 weeks to the project for 40 hours/week. Students will be required to attend a weekly community health engagement group discussion with other students involved in this track to reflect on the experience. In addition, during this time, faculty mentors will rotate to lead a discussion focused on their area of expertise in community engagement methods and/or research projects.

As a culmination to the summer experience, each intern will be expected to produce an abstract and a poster presentation that reflects the intern’s involvement in the project. There will be a possibility in some cases to collaborate in an ongoing basis to produce other academic products such as presentations for national meetings and publications, depending on the project and interest/involvement of the intern. MD/MPH candidates are encouraged to apply.

Research Opportunities and Mentors

Heidi Beidinger, PhD, University of Notre Dame
Beidinger is leading efforts in partnering with the Near Northwest Neighborhood of South Bend, Indiana to address and conduct research on the community’s lead poisoning issue. Her team has completed two rounds of testing for the Lead Sample Collection Kits. The Lead Sample Collection Kits provide supplies to collect paint chips, house dust, and soil from in or near a residence.  The samples are then returned to our lab for analysis with an automated X-ray fluorimeter.  The test results are placed into a report that explains the meaning of the lead levels from the different locations sampled. The report provides information on steps to take to prevent lead exposure.

In winter of 2017, students used our version 1 kit to test 325 homes. This experiment showed that citizen science is a viable way to test large numbers of homes.   In the summer of 2018, we tested the version 2 kit in 47 homes, while also testing the lead levels with conventional procedures. This experiment showed that the results from the kits are similar to the results from conventional testing. However, the kits are much easier to scale up to test large numbers of homes.  The third phase of testing began piloting in November 2018.  This IMPRS opportunity will continue to research and improve the lead testing kits with the citizen scientists of our community.

Tamara Hannon, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
Hannon is a national leader in childhood obesity and the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes in youth.  Her research program involves primary and secondary prevention of type 2 diabetes, and the development of interventions to improve self-care in adolescents with obesity, prediabetes, and diabetes.  Her mission is to translate diabetes prevention programs using community engagement methods so that they can be utilized in community settings with underserved populations. Students working with her will participate in community-engaged and patient-engaged research, including study recruitment, implementation of prevention programs, and data analysis.

Carrie Lawrence, PhD, Indiana University Bloomington
Lawrence is a practitioner-academic and public health advocate with several years of practice experience in nonprofit and social services.  Her applied research examines addressing social justice, health disparities and inequalities by empowering communities to collectively act upon their own health priorities, inform program design and development as well as health policy and system transformation. Dr. Lawrence has initiated several community-based participatory and translational research projects employing multiple methods that engage and empower community members in identifying, leveraging and sustaining local resources to promote and support individual health. Her current research explores the development of a health commons framework to address consequences of policy on local communities and through collective action local residents address deficits created by policy agendas counter to their goals

Debra Litzleman, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
Students will work with Litzleman and WeCare Indiana. WeCare Indiana is a program designed to reduce the risk factors for infant mortality through a combination of two way SMS messaging (text messages) and health coaching.  The five targeted factors include:

  • Decrease in: 1) Smoking, 2) Obesity, 3) Mental health issues
  • Increase in:  1) Safe sleep practices, 2) Breastfeeding

Student responsibilities include:

  • Work closely with WeCare Indiana team to develop materials for use in WeCare Indiana program
  • Be involved in the manuscript development process for WeCare Indiana data dissemination. Includes but not limited to literature review, writing, reviewing, editing, and formatting for publication
  • Review list of resources in WeCare Indiana app and update by reaching out to service provider to make sure information listed is current and correct.
  • Assist with data analysis of preliminary results from WeCare Indiana
  • Visits sites to ensure program is working smoothly and learn of any issues clinic staff are dealing with in regards to WeCare Indiana

Preferred qualifications:
As a summer WeCare intern, your job would be a supporting role to the WeCare Indiana team based at Regenstrief Institute.  In this supportive role, you would be expected to assist WeCare Indiana team members at Regenstrief and available clinics in a myriad of tasks to ensure the program is running smoothly.  This includes working to create processes for information feedback from participants, visiting sites to understand implementation and flow, creating, reviewing, and editing materials needed for the coaches’ use, monitoring data entering, developing manuscripts, analyzing preliminary data, and more.  Further, there will be times you may work from the clinics by providing support to the coaches, recruiting patients, creating flyers, working to increase numbers for WeCare Indiana and more.  Your supportive role will change as the program’s needs change, as tasks will vary depending on the need of the program.

As a responsibility for this role, you will be expected to be open to learning and understanding the variety of factors linked to infant mortality, including social determinants of health, and the severity of infant mortality in the state. 

Dennis Savaiano, PhD, Indiana University School of Medicine
The Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI) and the Indiana State Department of Health have formed a new partnership to improve health in Indiana. This alliance will unite the state’s health coalition work with that of the Indiana CTSI, a partnership among Indiana University, Purdue University and the University of Notre Dame, in shared efforts to build community health partnerships across the state.

The alliance is led by the Indiana CTSI’s Community Health Partnerships program, which seeks to improve health in Indiana through community-university partnerships and community-based health research. Community Health Partnerships’ coalition-building efforts are already integrated across almost every county in Indiana through Purdue Extension, which is involved in more than 60 health coalitions and has extension educators in all 92 counties in the state.

Health coalitions involve both formal and informal groups of people working together to improve one or more aspects of health, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, healthy weight and asthma. They are a powerful tool for helping to change health behavior in a community, said Dennis Savaiano, PhD, associate director and Purdue liaison for Community Health Partnerships and Virginia Claypool Meredith Professor of Nutrition Policy at Purdue.

This IMPRS opportunity will work with the coalitions across the state on research such as community program evaluation, social network analysis, coalition building, and/or data analysis.

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Community Health Partnerships Medical Student program, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information:

For additional information about the program, please contact imprs@iupui.edu

IU School of Medicine-Evansville Academic Medicine Internship (Community Focus)

Program Overview

IU School of Medicine’s Evansville Academic Medicine Internship is designed for students wishing to explore medical education as a potential career path.

Structure of Internship

Interns will work with faculty mentor at IU School of Medicine-Evansville for a duration of 8-weeks involved in data summarization and analysis, literature review, generating graphical display of results, and drawing conclusions. There will be opportunities for presentation and publication with involvement extending beyond the summer project.

Financial Support

A total stipend of $3,820 for eight weeks.

Faculty/Mentor and Research Project

Mari Hopper, PhD, associate professor of cellular and integrative physiology

Project Title

Does Training Improve Student Perceptions and Communication Skills When Participating in Non-Didactic Small Group Learning Sessions?

Project Description

In Fall 2017, Indiana University School of Medicine (IU School of Medicine) adopted a “renewed” curriculum that delivered 50% of course content using non-didactic, small-group learning. Despite emphasis on small group learning, students received no training in this methodology. End of course evaluations indicated that students did not understand or value this non-didactic approach. The goal of the proposed study is to determine if providing a training session for first semester, first-year students will result in improved small group performance and student perceptions of small group learning sessions.

To assess small group dynamics from an observational standpoint, student sessions will be audiotaped. Recordings will be evaluated and scored by trained and independent evaluators using a rubric with five categories: Participation, Role, Session Performance, Interpersonal Interaction, and Independent Thinking. Additionally, to assess student perceptions of small group work, a 15-question survey will be distributed to the students at 3 separate intervals: 1) before any small group sessions or training takes place; 2) after recording two small group sessions and directly prior to the training session; and 3) following the training and after recording two additional small group sessions. Survey questions include topics such as group participation, preparation, interpersonal interactions, prior undergraduate small group experience, and perceptions of small group work as an effective adult learning strategy.

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the IU School of Medicine-Evansville Academic Medicine Internship, fill out the RedCap application form.

Contact Information

Mari K. Hopper, PhD
Assistant Professor of Cellular and Integrative Physiology
Indiana University
School of Medicine-Evansville
mkhopper@iupui.edu
Office: (812) 461-5437

Greater Lafayette Primary Care Scholar

Program Overview

The Greater Lafayette Primary Care Scholar is a program with primary care physicians in rural and urban areas with exposure to medically underserved populations with stipend of $2,000. The scholar will have the opportunity to complete a project with the broad goal of studying, devising, and implementing one or more process improvements that improve medical care. No housing is provided and applicants must have their own transportation. The dates are arranged with the preceptor. The number of opportunities for 2019 has not yet been determined.

Student Eligibility:

Preference is for West Lafayette campus students. West Lafayette campus students are provided application materials in November with a due date of January 11, 2019. Applicants from other campuses may request an application from Ray Munguia, MD, PhD at rmunguia@purdue.edu.

Contact Information:

For additional information, please contact Dr. Ray Munguia at rmunguia@purdue.edu.

Health Services and Outcomes

Health services research is the multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to health care, the quality and cost of health care, and ultimately our health and well-being. ~ AcademyHealth, 2000

Health Services and Outcomes at Regenstrief Institute

Health services research (HSR) is the multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health information and communication, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to health care, the quality and cost of health care, and ultimately all individuals involved in the process of delivering and receiving healthcare, patients, caregivers, providers, provider teams, and health care systems. HSR investigators contribute to the science of translation and practical application by helping original research findings make a successful journey from scientific evidence to sustainable, wide scale implementation.

Founded in 1969, The Regenstrief Institute today is a robust research platform for over 90 academically-appointed scientists working collaboratively to investigate and develop ways to apply innovative technology, research, and models and measures of care to improve the health and outcomes of patients – in our community, region, nation, and world. Each of the following three centers maintain a core focus, which guides their contributions to create pathways to better care and better health.

IU Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research (IU CHSOR)
IU CHSOR health services researchers conduct high-impact, transdisciplinary research in health communication, applied health informatics, healthcare delivery for mental illness and symptom management, patient safety, implementation and evaluation of decision support, health professions practice and education, global health services research, and pharmacoepidemiology. All of the faculty are experienced mentors who value the addition of medical students to their working groups. Scholarly opportunities for medical students within the Health Services and Outcomes Research group are varied, including: clinical trials, health communication, health information technology, and process improvement/systems intervention.

To support the HSR mission across regional, national and international settings, many IUCHSOR scientists work within the Veterans Affairs Health Services Research & Development Center for Health Information and Communication at the Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center in addition to research housed at the Regenstrief Institute headquarters.

Faculty Research Mentors

Matthew J. Bair, MD, MS
Dawn M. Bravata, MD
Clint Cary, MD, MPH
David A. Haggstrom, MD, MAS
Joy Lee, PhD, MS
Debra K. Litzelman, MA, MD, MACP
Marianne Matthias, PhD
April Savoy, PhD
Linda Williams, MD

Indiana University Center for Aging Research (IUCAR)

IU Center for Aging Research located within Regenstrief Institute works to transform health care for medically and socially vulnerable older adults by testing and implementing innovative strategies that improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare and self-care for this population. Researchers in IUCAR enjoy national and international recognition for their expertise in clinical research on the aging brain, health promotion, and innovative models of collaborative care.

Faculty Mentors

Jennifer Carnahan, MD, MPH, MA
Nicole R. Fowler, PhD, MHSA
Babar Khan, MD, MS

Regenstrief Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBMI)

The Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBMI) is focused on improving healthcare through informatics. CBMI develops and applies health information technology solutions to generate knowledge about health, disease and treatment; help clinicians make optimal decisions; empower patients, and inform healthcare policy. To do so, CBMI works with clinical applications, computer-based decision support, data mining, advanced analytics, healthcare information standards and global health. CBMI has developed and advanced one of the nation’s first electronic medical record systems, one of the country’s first computerized provider order entry systems, and a health information exchange that has made Indiana the most health-wired state in the country and a national model for health data exchange.

These applications and tools are widely recognized for the roles in improving the quality of care, efficiency of healthcare delivery, reducing medical errors and enhancing patient safety.

Faculty Mentors

Brian E. Dixon, MPA, PhD
Shaun Grannis, MD, MS, FAAFP

Structure of Internship

  • Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty/research project availability.
  • Interns will be expected to dedicate a minimum of 8 weeks to the project for 40 hours/week.
  • Interns will be required to attend the weekly IMPRS Summer Research Student Seminar Series and relevant Regenstrief work-in-progress (WIP) meetings.

As a culmination to the summer experience, each intern will be expected to produce an abstract and a poster presentation that reflects the intern’s involvement in the project. There will be a possibility in some cases to collaborate in an ongoing basis to produce other academic products such as presentations for national meetings and publications, depending on the project and interest/involvement of the intern. MD/MPH candidates are encouraged to apply.

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for placement with a Regenstrief faculty researchers working in health services and outcomes, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review. Prior to submitting applications, students are strongly encouraged to initiate communication directly with their top choices of mentors to learn more about the type of work ongoing in individual labs. Emails are welcome!

Contact Information

For additional information about the program, please contact imprs@iupui.edu.

IU Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research

The Indiana University Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research (IU CHSOR), Indiana University Center for Aging Research (IU CAR), and Regenstrief Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBMI) are the three primary research centers within the Institute collaboratively working to advance the science of continually improving healthcare delivery systems.

  • IU CHSOR improves the delivery and outcomes of heath care through innovative research on health information, technology, and communication.
  • IU CAR transforms health care for vulnerable elders. The center develops, tests, and implements innovative strategies to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare and self-care for medically and socially vulnerable older adults.
  • CBMI develops and evaluates innovative informatics solutions to improve patient care and translate these solutions into cost-effective, operational systems, including a dynamic electronic medical record system.
  • Scholarly opportunities for medical students within the Health Services and Outcomes Research group are varied, including: clinical trials, health communication, health information technology, and process improvement/systems intervention. All of the faculty are experienced mentors who value the addition of medical students to their working groups.

Why is health services research important?

Health services research (HSR) experts study how social factors, health delivery systems and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to health care, the quality and cost of care, and the health and well-being of patients. HSR investigators contribute to the science of translation and practical application by helping original research findings make a successful journey from scientific evidence to sustainable, wide scale implementation.

Structure of Internship

Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty/health systems leader availability. Interns will be required to attend the weekly IMPRS Summer Research Student Seminar Series and relevant Regenstrief work-in-progress (WIP) meetings.

Faculty Mentors Research Description
Dawn M. Bravata, MD (IU CHSOR) Project examining the health and well-being benefits of participatory arts therapy (which includes music therapy and creative arts therapy) for patients and caregivers (location Roudebush VA HSR&D Center for Health Information and Communication)
Jennifer Carnahan, MD, MPH, MA (IU CAR) OPTIMISTIC research program
Clint Cary, MD, MPH (IU CHSOR) Data collection for a testicular cancer project to assess recurrence and survival outcomes following surgery for early stage testis cancer
Brian E. Dixon, MPA, PhD, FHIMSS (CBMI) Dr. Dixon’s work is focused in the domain of Public Health Informatics. Project opportunities include 1) chart reviews to validate ICD coding in medical records and examination of factors associated with inaccurate records, 2) identification of true vs. false positive diagnoses in the reporting of notifiable conditions, or 3) identification of non-clinical data sources for social determinants of health with potential for use in clinical decisions as well as research.
Nicole R. Fowler, PhD, MHSA (IU CAR) Research focused on identifying and addressing the impact of dementia in patient and caregiver populations
Shaun Grannis, MD, MS, FAAFP(CBMI) Dr. Grannis works to advance technical infrastructure and data-sharing capabilities through improved health information system identity management and implementation and evaluation of automated patient record matching strategies. Interns will review the output of record linkage algorithms to evaluate the accuracy of those algorithms and have the opportunity to validate other machine learning algorithms.
David A. Haggstrom, MD, MAS(IU CHSOR) Cancer population analytics and patient-centered informatics; project to enhance and evaluated an electronic personal health record to meet the needs of cancer survivors
Babar Khan, MD, MS (IU CAR) Data management or subject recruitment in the ICU for the Mobile Critical Care Recovery Program (mCCRP) and in a program to Decrease Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias after Delirium through Exercise and Cognitive Training(DDD-ECT)
Debra K. Litzelman, MA, MD, MACP (IU CHSOR) WeCare Indiana project working to reduce local infant mortality using a community health coaching model; global health services research projects (IU Center for Global Health)
Marianne Matthias, Ph.D. (HSR) Dr. Matthias focuses on communication in chronic pain care and in mental health, with specific research interest in patient-provider communication and clinical decision-making. Project opportunity includes conducting post-intervention qualitative interviews in a study evaluating a peer coach-led intervention to improve pain symptoms (ECLIPSE). (Location Roudebush VA HSR&D Center for Health Information and Communication.)

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for to Regenstrief’s Institute, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information

For additional information about the program, please contact imprs@iupui.edu.

Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

Program Overview

The Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CCBB) was founded in 2003 in the IU School of Medicine. The CCBB mission is to promote advanced computation and informatics approaches to increase our understanding of normal and disease-associated biological processes, drug development, and therapeutic responses and to educate the next generation of bioinformaticians through direct participation in research activities. The Medical Student Internship Program in the CCBB is designed to teach medical students the skills needed to conduct computational biology and bioinformatics research in both clinical science and basic science. This program will facilitate the understanding of methods and tools used in high through-put omics data analysis and will apply those tools to a practicum project.

Why is computational biology and bioinformatics important?

Computational biology and bioinformatics are closely integrated with almost all phases of biomedical research, such as disease mechanism and drug target discovery in the basic science research, and biomarker discovery in the clinical research. Its role in the precision medicine research is even more prominent. In this era of “big data”, an enormous amount of public domain omics data resources is becoming a driving force for biomedical research.

Structure of Internship

Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty availability. CCBB will partner students with affiliated scientist at Indiana Institute of Personalized Medicine, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Regenstrief, CTSI, Eskenazi or IU Health for a broad and comprehensive internship experience. Interns will be asked to design a computational biology and bioinformatics project using the tools specific to the selected CCBB faculty lab. Interns will be required to attend this faculty lab meeting and CCBB seminar series for formal training and project development.

Faculty Mentor Research Description
Yunlong Liu Bioinformatics approaches to understand regulatory mechanisms of gene expression.
Chi Zhang Single cell genomics and bioinformatics.
Sara Quinney In silico models to better understand factors influencing drug pharmacokinetics and response.
Jun Wan Cancer informatics.
Jie Zhang Systems biology.

Application Process:

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics program, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information:

For additional information about the program, please contact imprs@iupui.edu.

Translational Laboratory Sciences

Translational research includes two areas of translation. One is the process of applying discoveries generated during research in the laboratory, and in preclinical studies, to the development of trials and studies in humans. The second area of translation concerns research aimed at enhancing the adoption of best practices in the community. Cost-effectiveness of prevention and treatment strategies are also an important part of translational sciences.

Student Research Program in Translational and Laboratory Sciences

Program Overview

The Translational/Laboratory Research, formerly known as “Student Research Program in Academic Medicine (SRPinAM)”, began in 1983 to provide laboratory-based biomedical research opportunities for medical students in order to facilitate physician-scientist career development. Support for students participating in this is derived from multiple institutional training grants awarded from the National Institutes of Health, the IU School of Medicine Dean’s Office, and the Center for Translational Science Institute (CTSI).

Structure of Internship:

Medical students participating in translational and laboratory sciences can spend 10 weeks conducting an independent research project under the guidance of IU School of Medicine research mentors as well as attending weekly seminars addressing responsible conduct of research, scientific rigor, and career development. At the end of the program, all students present their work at the IMPRS Poster Session.

Medical students are encouraged to consider participating in this program as a launching pad for other biomedical research opportunities (e.g., MedSTAR, NIH MSRP, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship and Doris Duke Research Programs) as they develop into physician scientists within their IU School of Medicine medical education and beyond.

A goal for IMPRS is that the students who participate in this program would decide to continue to be involved in research with their summer mentor throughout their medical education. Questions about this option, please discuss with your mentor and reach out to either Dr. Brittney-Shea Herbert or Anne Nguyen by email.

Application Process:

Students are encouraged to identify and meet with participating faculty mentors so that they can indicate their specific research mentor preference on their application. Qualified applicants who do not list a preferred research mentor or who identify research mentors with no available lab openings will be assigned to a research mentor that as closely as possible aligns with the student’s research interests.

For a list of participating faculty research mentors and a brief description of their research interests, please follow the link: Research Mentors. If you need to find the faculty mentors that have research in your area of interests, go to the IU School of Medicine ReSEARCH Connect database.

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Student Research Program in Translational and Laboratory Sciences, fill out the RedCap application form.

Contact Information

For additional information about the program, please email imprs@iupui.edu.

Student Research Program in the Short-Term Training Program in Biomedical Sciences

Program Overview

The Short-Term Training Program in Biomedical Sciences at IU School of Medicine has now been funded by NIH for over 25 years and has provided a structured research environment that engages medical students’ interest in biomedical research, creating opportunities for basic and translational research experience, and education in research ethics. The overall goal of the training program is to serve as a portal to train and recruit physician-scientists. The program is designed to: a) increase student awareness to the value of doing biomedical research, challenging them to take on independent projects, and; b) strongly support students interested in careers in academic medicine by providing access to opportunities in the MD/PhD program, and assistance with research fellowship applications to HHMI and NIH. Trainees engage in mentored research experience in areas that reflect the school’s strength and international reputation in hematopoiesis, immunity, pulmonary and cardiovascular biology, cancer, diabetes and medical informatics.

Structure of Internship

Medical students participating in Short-Term Training Program in Biomedical Sciences will spend 12 weeks conducting an independent research project under the guidance of IU School of Medicine research mentors as well as attending weekly seminars addressing responsible conduct of research, scientific rigor, and career development. At the end of the program, all students present their work in the IMPRS Poster Session.

Medical students are encouraged to consider participating in this program as a launching pad for other biomedical research opportunities (e.g., MedSTAR, NIH MSRP, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship and Doris Duke Research Programs) as they develop into physician scientists within their IU School of Medicine medical education and beyond. A goal for IMPRS is that the students who participate in this program would decide to continue to be involved in research with their summer mentor throughout their medical education. Questions about this option, please discuss with your mentor and reach out to either Dr. Brittney-Shea Herbert or Anne Nguyen by email.

Application Process

Students are encouraged to identify and meet with participating faculty mentors so that they can indicate their specific research mentor preference on their application. Qualified applicants who do not list a preferred research mentor or who identify research mentors with no available lab openings will be assigned to a research mentor that as closely as possible aligns with the student’s research interests.

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Student Research Program in the Short-Term Training Program in Biomedical Sciences, fill out the RedCap application form.

Faculty Mentors

Molecular Cardiac Development and Failure

  • Chenleng Cai, PhD
  • Ching-Pin Chang, MD, PhD
  • Simon Conway, PhD
  • Ken Cornetta, PhD
  • Loren Field, PhD
  • Anthony Firulli, PhD
  • Weinan Shou, PhD
  • Stephanie Ware, PhD
  • Monte Willis, MD, PhD

Pulmonary Function in Health and Disease

  • Micheala Aldred, PhD
  • Mark Geraci, MD
  • Susan Gunst, PhD
  • Babar Khan, MD
  • Tim Lahm, MD
  • Margaret Schwarz, MD
  • Robert Tepper, MD
  • Homer Twigg, MD

Cardiovascular Complications of Kidney Disease

  • Rajiv Agarwal, MD
  • Tarek Ashkar, MD
  • Robert Bacallao, MD
  • David Basile, PhD
  • Pierre Dagher, MD
  • Ken Dunn, PhD
  • Alice Mitchell, MD
  • Sharon Moe, MD
  • Bruce Molitoris, MD

Macro- and Mirco- Vascular Reactivity and Disease

  • Matthew Allen, PhD
  • Jeffrey Breall, MD, PhD
  • Matthias Clauss, PhD
  • Rolf Kreutz, MD
  • Roberto Machado, MD
  • Alexander Obukhov, PhD
  • Michael Sturek, MD

Cardiac Function, Ischemic Injury and Arrhythmias

  • Peng-Sheng Chen, MD
  • Samir Gupta, MD
  • Jeff Kline, MD
  • Kieren Mather, MD
  • Peter Pang, MD
  • Mark Payne, MD
  • Jesse Stewart, MD
  • Johnathan Tune, PhD

Regnerative Medicine Stem/Progenitor Cells Hematopoiesis

  • Hal Broxmeyer, PhD
  • Utpal Dave, MD
  • Laura Haneline, MD
  • Reuben Kapur, PhD
  • Michael Murphy, MD
  • Grzegorz Nalepa, MD, PhD
  • Heather O’Leary, PhD
  • Christie Orschell, PhD
  • Yunlong Liu, PhD

Contact Information

For additional information about the program, please email imprs@iupui.edu.

Student Research Program in the Immunology and Infectious Diseases Training Program (IIDTP)

Program Overview

The Immunology and Infectious Diseases Training Program (IIDTP) at IU School of Medicine has now been funded by NIH for 15 years and has had a significant national impact in addressing this need by preparing a diverse and talented cadre of students and fellows for careers in academics, medicine, government, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. The overall goal of the training program is to provide a rich training environment for pre-doctoral fellows, postdoctoral fellows, and medical student (short-term trainees in the IMPRS) engaged in immunology and infectious disease research. The program is built around a collaborative group of 31 highly productive and collaborative investigators with shared research interests. The key to the success of the faculty and the IIDTP an emphasis on cross-disciplinary approaches to address questions related to host responses to infection and inflammation. Faculty and trainees are drawn from several departments and centers on campus including Microbiology and Immunology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Physiology, Dermatology, and the Wells Center for Pediatric Research. Program faculty from Dermatology and Pediatrics also hold appointments in basic science departments.

Structure of Internship

Medical students participating in IIDTP will spend 12 weeks conducting an independent research project under the guidance of IU School of Medicine research mentors as well as attending weekly seminars addressing responsible conduct of research, scientific rigor, and career development. At the end of the program, all students present their work in the IMPRS Poster Session.

Some IMPRS programs may require additional time and effort from participants beyond the fixed dates listed in the time line. Students will be notified in advance and compensated for this additional effort. Flexibility in these specific research programs will be offered to ensure that students can remain focused on their academic requirements and career advancement.

Medical students are encouraged to consider participating in this program as a launching pad for other biomedical research opportunities (e.g., MedSTAR, NIH MSRP, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship and Doris Duke Research Programs) as they develop into physician scientists within their IU School of Medicine medical education and beyond. A goal for IMPRS is that the students who participate in this program would decide to continue to be involved in research with their summer mentor throughout their medical education. Questions about this option, please discuss with your mentor and reach out to either Brittney-Shea Herbert, PhD, or Anne Nguyen by email.

Application Process

Students are encouraged to identify and meet with participating faculty mentors so that they can indicate their specific research mentor preference on their application. Qualified applicants who do not list a preferred research mentor or who identify research mentors with no available lab openings will be assigned to a research mentor that as closely as possible aligns with the student’s research interests.

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Student Research Program in the Student Research Program in the Immunology and Infectious Diseases Training Program (IIDTP), fill out the RedCap application form.

Faculty Mentors

Program Director: Mark H. Kaplan, PhD Assistant Program Director: Stacey Gilk, PhD

IIDTP Mentors Department
Elliot Androphy Dermatology
Gustavo Arrizbalagna Pharmacology and Toxicology
David Basile Cellular and Integrative Physiology
Hal E. Broxmeyer Microbiology and Immunology
Randy R. Brutkiewicz Microbiology and Immunology
Joan Cook-Mills Pediatrics
Utpal P. Dave Microbiology and Immunology
Mahua Dey Neurological Surgery
Alexander L. Dent Microbiology and Immunology
Burcin Ekser Surgery
Carmella Evans-Molina Medicine
Haitao Guo Microbiology and Immunology
Stacey Gilk Microbiology and Immunology
David Hains Pediatrics
Roland W. Herzog Pediatrics
Mark H. Kaplan Pediatrics
Kirsten Kloepfer Pediatrics
Michael P. Murphy Surgery
David Nelson Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
Sophie Paczesny Pediatrics-Hematology/Oncology
Andrew Schwaderer Pediatrics
Stanley M. Spinola Microbiology and Immunology
William J. Sullivan, Jr. Microbiology and Immunology
Tuan M. Tran Microbiology and Immunology
Matthew J. Turner Dermatology
X. Frank Yang Microbiology and Immunology
Kai Yang Pediatrics
Qigui (Andy) Yu Microbiology and Immunology
Baohua Zhou Pediatrics

Contact Information

For additional information about the program, please email imprs@iupui.edu.

Student Research Program in the Comprehensive Musculoskeletal Training Program

Program Overview

The goals of the Comprehensive Musculoskeletal Training Program are to (1) expand and integrate current musculoskeletal research and teaching programs in the basic, clinical, and engineering sciences; (2) train young scientists at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels for research careers as basic scientists, bioengineers, clinical and translational investigators pursuing the causes of, and solutions to, musculoskeletal disease; and (3) train both pre- and postdoctoral students/fellows, according to the six Core Competencies outlined by the National Postdoctoral Association. Key activities include the development of a discipline-specific knowledge base, research skill development, enhancement of communication skills; professionalism, leadership and management skills.

Structure of Internship

Medical students participating in Comprehensive Musculoskeletal Training Program will spend 12 weeks conducting an independent research project under the guidance of IU School of Medicine research mentors as well as attending weekly seminars addressing responsible conduct of research, scientific rigor, and career development. At the end of the program, all students present their work in the IMPRS Poster Session.

Some IMPRS programs may require additional time and effort from participants beyond the fixed dates listed in the time line. Students will be notified in advance and compensated for this additional effort. Flexibility in these specific research programs will be offered to ensure that students can remain focused on their academic requirements and career advancement.

Medical students are encouraged to consider participating in this program as a launching pad for other biomedical research opportunities (e.g., MedSTAR, NIH MSRP, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship and Doris Duke Research Programs) as they develop into physician scientists within their IU School of Medicine medical education and beyond. A goal for IMPRS is that the students who participate in this program would decide to continue to be involved in research with their summer mentor throughout their medical education. Questions about this option, please discuss with your mentor and reach out to either Dr. Brittney-Shea Herbert or Anne Nguyen by email.

Application Process

Students are encouraged to identify and meet with participating faculty mentors so that they can indicate their specific research mentor preference on their application. Qualified applicants who do not list a preferred research mentor or who identify research mentors with no available lab openings will be assigned to a research mentor that as closely as possible aligns with the student’s research interests.

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Student Research Program in the Comprehensive Musculoskeletal Training Program, fill out the RedCap application form.

Faculty Mentors

Program Director: David B. Burr, PhD

Matt Allen, PhD
Teresita Bellido, PhD
Joe Bidwell, PhD
Andrea Bonetto, PhD
Lynda Bonewald, PhD
Angela Bruzzaniti, PhD
David Burr, PhD
John Chirgwin, PhD
Linda DiMeglio, MD, MPH, MA
Michael Econs, MD
Theresa Guise, MD
Erik Imel, MD
Melissa Kacena, PhD
Todd McKinley, MD
Sharon Moe, MD
Fred Pavalko, PhD
Lilian Plotkin, PhD
Alex Robling, PhD
David Roodman, MD, PhD
Uma Sankar, PhD
William Thompson, PhD
Stephen Trippel, MD
Joseph Wallace, PhD
Stuart Warden, PhD
Kenneth White, PhD
Monte Willis, MD, PhD, MBA
Hiroki Yokota, PhD
Teresa Zimmers, PhD

Contact Information

For additional information about the program, please email imprs@iupui.edu.

Student Research Fellowship Program (SRFP) at IU School of Medicine-Bloomington

Program Overview

IU School of Medicine-Bloomington basic science faculty members sponsor laboratory research opportunities for undergraduate or medical students as part of a ten-week Summer Research Program. Students will work under close supervision of a faculty mentor. The students will have the opportunity to work on research projects in cell, molecular and cancer biology, or in educational research. Participants in the program will be exposed to all facets of biomedical research including literature review, experimental design, data generation and analysis. Students may have the opportunity to submit abstracts and present at national meetings.

Structure of Internship

Medical students participating in the SRFP at IU School of Medicine-Bloomington can spend 10 weeks conducting an independent research project under the guidance of IUS-Bloomington research mentors as well as attending weekly seminars addressing responsible conduct of research, scientific rigor, and career development via Zoom. At the end of the program, all students present their work at the IMPRS Poster Session in Indianapolis, IN.

Faculty Mentors

Students are encouraged to check out the research interests of faculty.

Faculty Mentor Research Interest
Richard Carpenter, PhD Researchers in this lab uses proteomics, genomics, and bioinformatics to study how transcription factors are regulated in cancer cells and the subsequent genomic programs induced by these transcription factors. We have a strong interest in transcription factors that play a role in tumor progression, metastasis, and angiogenesis.
David Daleke, PhD Study focuses on molecular mechanisms controlling phospholipid organization in biological membranes, with an emphasis on the effects of diabetes on membrane lipid organization and the characterization and identification of phospholipid transporters, or “flippases.”
John Foley, PhD Lab studies the epithelial-mesenchyme interactions in the repair and regeneration of specialized skin of the nipple. Information gained from basic studies are directed toward developing a cell-based regeneration nipple strategy for mastectomy patients.
Wayne Forrester, PhD Lab studies directed cell migration during metazoan development. Abnormal cell migration can lead to the spread of cancer cells. Investigators apply genetic, molecular and genomic approaches to the study cell migration, using the small, experimentally tractable nematode C. elegans.
Peter Hollenhorst, PhD Researchers in this lab use genomics and bioinformatics approaches to study the mechanisms that ETS family transcription factors use to interact with the genome in an effort to delineate both normal and oncogenic functions of these proteins.
Heather Hundley, PhD Lab team is interested in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and utilizes a combination of biochemistry, genomics and molecular biology to identify the molecular mechanisms that regulate RNA editing and the consequences of aberrant editing on gene expression.
Polly Husmann, PhD Research focuses on factors outside of the classroom that affect student learning.  Examples include study habits, metacognitive skills, self-directed, and self-regulated learning.  Studies evaluate these factors in undergraduate, graduate, and medical student populations.
Anirban Mitra, PhD This lab seeks to understand the paracrine and juxtacrine interactions between cancer cells and their microenvironment that regulate metastatic colonization in ovarian cancer with a specific interest in the regulation of key microRNAs and transcription factors.
Kenneth P. Nephew, PhD Investigators in this lab are using next generation sequencing technology and computational models to explore the role of epigenetics in ovarian cancer cells, cancer stem cells and resistance to chemotherapy. The team also studies breast cancer, estrogen receptor biology and endocrine resistance.
Heather O’Hagan, PhD Researchers in this lab study the role of oxidative DNA damage in initiating cancer-specific epigenetic changes. Investigators examine chromatin changes that occur acutely during DNA repair and how the persistence of these changes may lead to heritable changes in gene expression.
Claire Walczak, PhD Lab is interested in the molecular mechanisms that govern mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation in both normal and tumor-derived cells. Researchers in this group are developing screening assays to identify new drugs that target microtubule assembly.

Application Process

Students are encouraged to identify and meet with participating faculty mentors so that they can indicate their specific research mentor preference on their application. Qualified applicants who do not list a preferred research mentor or who identify research mentors with no available lab openings will be assigned to a research mentor that as closely as possible aligns with the student’s research interests.

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for a summer research position with an IU Bloomington research faculty, fill out the RedCap application form.

Contact Information

For additional information about the program, please email imprs@iupui.edu.

Student Research Fellowship Program (SRFP) at IU School of Medicine-Northwest

Program Overview

Each year, IU School of Medicine-Northwest basic science faculty members sponsor undergraduate or medical students in their research laboratories as part of an eight–ten-week Summer Research Internship Program. The program provides the students the opportunities to work alongside in research laboratories under close supervision of a faculty mentor. The students will have the opportunity to work on a diverse area of research projects such as neuroscience, infectious diseases, innate immunity, muscle biology, obesity, aging, retinal physiology and diseases, corneal innervation and dry eye disease and others. Participation in the program, the students will be exposed to all facets of biomedical research including literature review, experimental design, data gathering and analysis.

Faculty Mentors

Faculty members who routinely sponsor students in their research laboratories.

Ted Bae, PhD
Dipika Gupta, PhD
Des Kashyap
Roman Dziarski, PhD
Tanya Kostrominova, PhD
Brian Kennedy, PhD
Ernest Talarico, PhD

Application Process

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. To apply for the Student Research Program (SRFP) at IU School of Medicine-Northwest, fill out the RedCap application form.

Contact Information

Students interested in the IU School of Medicine-NW summer internship program are encouraged to contact directly the faculty member with whom you wish to work, or you may see Dr. Marfurt for assistance.

Summer Research Program at IU School of Medicine-South Bend

Program Overview

IU School of Medicine students at the South Bend campus are invited to enrich their educational and training experiences by engaging in a variety of basic science research opportunities during the summer after their first year. Students have the opportunity to conduct research in faculty laboratories with the goals of publishing their work, presenting at national conferences, and building a strong foundation for lifelong scholarship. IU School of Medicine—South Bend faculty direct research programs in medical ethics and population health, inflammatory and infectious diseases, vascular biology, cell and molecular biology, and cancer biology. IU School of Medicine—South Bend has a partnership with the University of Notre Dame graduate program, which allows medical students to benefit from working side-by-side with graduate student and postdoctoral researchers.

Faculty Mentors

David Boone, PhD
Karen Cowden-Dahl, PhD
Rich Dahl, PhD
Mark Fox, MD, PhD, MPH
Jeni Prosperi, PhD
Molly Scheel, PhD
Roderich Schwarz, MD, PhD
Margaret Schwarz, MD
Urs von Holzen, MD

Application Process

If you are interested in the program, application process begins November 2018 by filling out the online application.

Contact Information

Students who are interested in applying for a summer research opportunity should contact Dr. Tracy Vargo at tvargogo@iu.edu or imprs@iupui.edu.

Student Summer Research Program (SSRP) at IU School of Medicine-Terre Haute

Program Overview

IU School of Medicine-Terre Haute is offering a ten-week Summer Research with Foundational Sciences faculty. The opportunity allows medical students to participate in all facets of biomedical research including literature review, experimental design, data collection and analysis. Students will be encouraged to submit and present an abstract at the conclusion of the internship.

Faculty Mentor

Steven Templeton, PhD: Immune response to the human opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus.

Scott Canfield, PhD: Stem cell-derived blood-brain barrier.

Application Process

If you are interested in the program, click here to access the RedCap application.

Applications are due on January 28, 2019. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Student Summer Research Program (SSRP) at IU School of Medicine-West Lafayette

Program Overview

IU School of Medicine-West Lafayette encourages students interested in research on the Purdue campus to discuss areas of interest with the Campus Director, Regina Kreisle, MD, PhD (rkreisle@purdue.edu). Funding is available for eight weeks of summer research. Students may have the opportunity to submit abstracts to, and present at, national meetings.

Contact Information

Those interested in additional information should contact Dr. Ray Munguia at rmunguia@purdue.edu.

Summer Research in Biomedical Engineering

Program Overview

There are many opportunities for summer research and technology innovation for medical students interested in working closely with a faculty member on basic or translational research for a compelling healthcare need through the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering at Purdue University.

Faculty Mentors

Students interested in summer research can participate for 10 weeks in a wide spectrum of projects within the School’s four areas of research excellence:  engineered biomaterials and biomechanicsimaging, instrumentation, and quantitative cellular and systems engineering.  We will initiate a matching process for you with several potential mentors from over 75 related faculty members at both the Indianapolis and West Lafayette campuses.

Eligibility

Medical students in good standing who will have completed their first year (MS1) by the summer program onset are eligible to apply.   An engineering degree is not needed, however some research experience is required. Strong life sciences and quantitative skills are preferred.

Outcomes

At the end of the 10 weeks, each participant will submit an abstract to and present a poster at an IUSM IMPRS Poster Session on July 24, 2019.

Students selected for summer research should also consider a Scholarly Concentration in Biomedical Engineering and an intensive, one-year Master’s (MS) program in Biomedical Engineering that begins upon completion of the second year of medical training.

Application Process

Applications are due no later than Friday, February 22, 2019. Selection will be based on best-fit matching until all slots are filled. Apply now.

Contact Information

Questions may be directed to Anne Nquyen (annnguye@iu.edu) or Andrew Brightman (aob@purdue.edu).

Student Research Fellowship Program (SRFP) at IUSM-Muncie

Program Overview

The Student Research Fellowship is a structured program developed to provide students with basic research skills and practical experience in conducting research independently.

Student Eligibility

First-and second-year IUSM students are eligible to apply to this program. These students will be expected to lead the student research team and should expect to spend approximately 40 hours per week committed to the research project.

Application

To be considered for the 2019 Student Research Fellowship Program applicants must complete and submit the online application by 5:00 p.m. on March 31, 2019.

Contact Information

For additional information about the Student Research Fellowship Program, please contact Ila Verneman from IU School of Medicine in Muncie by iverneman@bsu.edu