Available Concentrations

IU School of Medicine’s Scholarly Concentrations empower students to explore an area of interest that is beneficial to personal and professional growth without adding any time to the four-year MD curriculum. Students develop powerful relationships with mentors and colleagues, exploring a concentration that highlights the school’s expertise and resources across the state.

Scholarly Concentrations Graphics

Questions?

There might just be an answer in Frequently Asked Questions!

Requirements and Timeline

To complete a concentration, students must complete all required courses in a pathway agreed upon by the student and concentration co-directors. Each concentration has specific requirements as well as core curriculum requirements. Students should review each concentration’s description and work closely with co-directors to ensure a concentration is the right fit.

What Will your Concentration Journey Look Like?


Available Concentration Topics


Biomedical Engineering and Applied Medical Technology

Home Campuses: West Lafayette

Overview

In the Biomedical Engineering and Applied Medical Technology Scholarly Concentration, medical students develop their understanding and application of biomedical engineering for the ethical design, development and translation of medical and related technologies. Students have opportunities to understand and advance design and translation of medical and related technologies into clinical settings through completion of a scholarly project. This concentration is a partnership with Purdue University’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering.

Locations and Availability

There are eight slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

Students will participate onsite in West Lafayette; completion of the scholarly project could be done remotely.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing this concentration will get an introduction to biomedical engineering design, development and deployment of medical and assistive technologies and their translation into clinical practice. Prior coursework or training in engineering is not necessary. Also, students will participate in start-up like practices as they learn how to build a business model, talk to customers and gain insight from experienced leaders in the field of medical devices/technologies. This is an experiential learning opportunity; teams will be engaged by “getting out of the building” and interviewing customers to discover the value of their ideas.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Biomedical Engineering and Translation of Medical Technologies Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Introduction to Customer Discovery Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Biomedical Engineering and Translation of Medical Technologies
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Introduction to Customer Discovery
Scholarly Concentration Product
Begin Scholarly Concentration ProjectComplete Scholarly Concentration Project

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Ethical design and implementation of wearable sensors for opioid useRecommend potential investment decisions to help an organization create and/or capture value.
  • Biomedical engineering of treatments for Parkinson’s disease
  • Clinical translation of a new biomedical diagnostic device for Preeclampsia
  • Clinical translation of a new biomedical diagnostic devices
Concentration Co-Directors Contact Information

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Raymundo Munguia-Vazquez, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology and Assistant Director of Enrichment Opportunities, IU School of Medicine-West Lafayette

Andrew O. Brightman, PhD
Assistant Head for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of Engineering Practice, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University

Craig Goergen
Leslie A. Geddes Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University


Business of Medicine

Home Campuses: Statewide (based in Indianapolis)

Overview

The Business of Medicine Scholarly Concentration prepares future physicians to apply the fundamentals of business in clinical environments. As a result, students learn how to improve medical outcomes, reduce costs and lift staff morale. Team-based consulting projects teach students to frame managerial challenges, envision new organizational solutions, evaluate tradeoffs in resources and outcomes, and implement improvements at an enterprise level.

Locations and Availability

There are 25 slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

All coursework (except the online Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship course) takes place in Indianapolis.

Scholarly project locations vary by project but focus on Bloomington and Indianapolis areas.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Business of Medicine concentration take the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. Coursework in finance, accounting, marketing, operations and economic behavior equips students to merge evidence-based management with evidence-based medicine. Students can further explore and apply business of medicine theory and skills in the concentration project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Value Creation and Financial Performance in Health Care SystemsFundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Business Management of the Patient ExperienceScholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product


Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Value Creation and Financial Performance in Health Care Systems
Business Management of the Patient Experience
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

The two topic-specific courses will only be offered during summers. Students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Analyze an organization’s strategic position in the marketplace and lay out a path for growth or greater impact over the next 3-5 years
  • Recommend potential investment decisions to help an organization create and/or capture value.
  • Implement an organizational change to improve effectiveness in targeted areas
  • Analyze operational flow to improve patient care and/or resource efficiency
Concentration Co-Directors Contact Information

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Kyle Anderson
Clinical Assistant Professor, Kelley School of Business

Charles Rudick, PhD
Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine


Care of Hispanic/Latino Patients

This concentration is not accepting new students at this time. Please consider applying for a different concentration.

Home Campus: West Lafayette

Overview

With numerous Hispanic and Latino patients in the United States, the need for culturally-sensitive medical care is vital. This Scholarly Concentration prepares students to meet this need by providing opportunities to:

  • Understand and apply culturally appropriate medical care
  • Improve fluency in the Spanish language
  • Use Spanish in a clinical setting
  • Improve medical care for Hispanic/Latino populations

Acceptance to this concentration requires an intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish as assessed by an application interview and completion of 300-level college Spanish coursework.

Due to the requirement of extensive oral practice of the Spanish language, it is not anticipated that students can begin this concentration after Phase 1 at this time.

Locations and Availability

There are no slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

While it is anticipated that most students participate in West Lafayette, some experiences can be made available remotely.

Curriculum and Timeline

Through coursework and Spanish-speaking experiences in medical settings, students explore cultural competencies, special issues in communication and medical Spanish fluency. Students further develop and demonstrate their knowledge through the scholarly project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Public Health Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Introduction to Care of Hispanic/Latino Patients Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Care of Hispanic/Latino Patients
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Introduction to Public Health
Scholarly Concentration Project

Scholarly Concentration Product

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Culture differences in patient care strategies between American and Mexican academic medical centers
  • Public health research in the Hispanic community
  • Defining culturally-appropriate care for Hispanic/Latino patients
  • Bilingual language acquisition in children
  • Obstacles to seeking care by Hispanic/Latino patients
  • Development of patient educational materials for Hispanic/Latino patients
Concentration Co-Directors

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Raymundo Munguia-Vazquez, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology

Thomas Jones, MD
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine

Cecilia Tonorio, MA
Lecturer and Program Director, Spanish Level 7 and 8; Translation, School of Languages and Cultures Purdue University


Ethics, Equity and Justice

This concentration is not accepting new students at this time. Please consider applying for another concentration.

Home Campus: South Bend

Overview

Medicine has the capacity for great good or great harm. Disproportionately experienced by marginalized communities, the harm is often perpetrated by well-intended individuals and institutions. This Scholarly Concentration provides the basic skills for separating the morally beneficial from the morally troubling practices of medicine while enabling future physicians to better serve and advocate for their most vulnerable patients.

Incorporating rigorous academic inquiry and experiential learning, this concentration covers a range of topics–from clinical ethics to health equity in communities. By completing this concentration, students join a cohort of like-minded peers and mentors, with rich opportunities for discussion and inquiry through the concentration’s journal club.

Locations and Availability

There are no slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

All coursework (except the online Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship course) takes place in South Bend.

The scholarly project work occurs in South Bend.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Ethics, Equity and Justice concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in medical ethics, equity and justice topics that are vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product. The journal club provides a platform for students to have longitudinal discussions about concentration-related topics with a cohort of students and faculty.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Medical EthicsFundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Ethics and Health EquityScholarly Concentration Project
Journal ClubScholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Medical Ethics
Ethics and Health Equity (Part 1)Ethics and Health Equity (Part 2)
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product
Journal Club

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Virtue ethics
  • Clinical ethics
  • End of life care
  • Health disparities
  • Community medicine
  • Social determinants of health
  • Disability ethics
  • Ethics in STEM education
  • Innovations in health access
  • The opioid crisis
  • The science of compassion
Concentration Co-Directors

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Joseph J. Kotva, Jr., PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Medicine, IU School of Medicine-South Bend

Mark D. Fox, MD, PhD, MPH
Associate Dean and Campus Director, Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine-South Bend
Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Theology, University of Notre Dame


Genetics in Medicine

Home Campus: Indianapolis

Overview

Medical genetics is rapidly changing and shaping patient care. Therefore, it’s imperative that clinicians understand cutting-edge diagnostic and treatment approaches. This Scholarly Concentration provides a deep-dive into the latest genetic developments and concepts that are transforming the practice of medicine. Students may explore clinical research—including lab diagnostics and gene therapy—clinical case reports with literature reviews, or new areas of interest.

Locations and Availability

There are 10 slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

All coursework (except the online Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship course) takes place in Indianapolis.

The scholarly project work occurs in Indianapolis.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Medical Genetics concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in medical genetics that is vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Effective Communications in Genomic Medicine Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Essential Laboratory Translation in Genomic Medicine Scholarly Concentration Project
Integrative Genomic Medicine Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Effective Communications in Genomic Medicine

Integrative Genomic Medicine
Scholarly Concentration Project
Essential Laboratory Translation in Genomic Medicine
Scholarly Concentration Product

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Genetic case reports
  • Synthesis of new genetic data supporting syndrome ID
  • Expanding care to patients who typically do not receive genetic testing
  • Longitudinal care of patient cohorts
  • Case studies of CAR-T and gene therapies in specific genetic conditions
  • Implementing clinical trials in gene therapy
  • Clinical correlation of abnormal metabolite findings
  • Clinical utility of chromosomal microarray analysis in the era of whole genome sequencing and whole exome sequencing
  • Clinical validity of APOL1 in chronic kidney disease progression
  • Cardiovascular genetics
  • Neurogenetics
  • Cancer genetics
Concentration Co-Directors

Daniel R. Brady, PhD
Lecturer and Graduate Program Advisor

Theodore E. Wilson, MD
Assistant Professor of Clinical and Medical and Molecular Genetics


Health Information Technology

Home Campus: Indianapolis

Overview

Technology is omnipresent in health care. In the Health Information Technology Scholarly Concentration, students gain an understanding of the components, concepts and relationships necessary to create, implement and use clinical information systems effectively. Through coursework and hands-on experiences, students learn to become better physicians by leveraging technology systems in increasingly complex health care systems.

Locations and Availability

There are four slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

All concentration coursework can be completed online.

The scholarly project work occurs in Indianapolis.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Health Informatics concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in health information technology that is vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Health Informatics Scholarship Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Public Health Informatics Scholarship Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Health Informatics Scholarship
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Public Health Informatics Scholarship
Scholarly Concentration Product
Scholarly Concentration Project

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Opiate analytics and visualizations
  • Clinical decision support
  • Operational research
  • Health information exchange
  • Social determinants of health
  • Population health
  • Care coordination
  • Electronic health record integration
  • Clinical informatics applications
  • Retrospective data-based studies
Concentration Co-Directors

John T. Finnell, MD
Research Scientist, Center for Biomedical Informatics, Regenstrief Institute
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, IU School of Medicine
Director, Clinical Informatics Fellowship, Regenstrief Institute

Brian E. Dixon, PhD, MPA
Research Scientist, Center for Biomedical Informatics and Center for Health Services Research, Regenstrief Institute
Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology, IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health
Director of Public Health Informatics, Regenstrief Institute, Inc. and IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health
Affiliate Scientist, VA Health Services Research and Development Center for Health Information and Communication, Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center


Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Home Campus: Muncie

Overview

Lifestyle choices regarding physical activity, nutrition, stress management and social support are major factors contributing to health outcomes. Changes in these behaviors can lead to better health outcomes, reduced health care costs and improved community health. Through this concentration, students learn how to help patients implement evidence-based lifestyle choices with a team of exercise physiologists, nutritionists, mental/behavioral health counselors, social workers and other health professionals.

Locations and Availability

There are five slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

Some concentration coursework can be completed online; some coursework takes place in Muncie.

The scholarly project work takes place in Muncie.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in public health and lifestyle medicine that will be vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Public Health Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Principles of Lifestyle Therapeutic ApproachesScholarly Concentration Project
Lifestyle MedicineScholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Public Health or Principles of Lifestyle Therapeutic Approaches
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Lifestyle Medicine
Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Increased access to primary care
  • Food distribution
  • Maternal addiction programs
  • Telemedicine and community outreach
  • Infusion of lifestyle medicine into primary care
  • Adult physical activity
  • Health lifestyle centers
Concentration Co-Directors

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Larry Fromm, PhD
Professor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine-Muncie
Assistant Campus Dean, IU School of Medicine-Muncie

Michael D. Litt, PhD
Associate Professor of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine-Muncie


Health Integration and Healthy Aging (Formerly Health Systems Science)

Home Campus: Fort Wayne

Overview

Modern healthcare is an ever-changing landscape.  Future physicians must learn to deliver high quality, cost-effective care within health systems. This concentration is based on health systems science, which emerged as the “third science” in medicine after basic and clinical sciences.  With an emphasis on patient-centered care, it focuses on improving outcomes while reducing costs of healthcare for patients/populations in a community setting. Topics include value-based care, care coordination, and healthcare policy/leadership examined through the lens of healthy aging. Students with interests in any specialty will benefit from this concentration.  Research projects may include adoption of new technology, managing complex health issues, health care policy studies, or health system integration to improve health care delivery.

Locations and Availability

There are 10 slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

Concentration coursework can be completed online.

The scholarly project work occurs in Fort Wayne.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing this concentration complete the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in public health, and an understanding of patient-centered care through the lens of healthy aging that students can further explore in the concentration project and product. The journal club provides a platform for students to have longitudinal discussions about concentration-related topics with a cohort of students and faculty.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Public Health Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Health System Integration in the Context of Healthy AgingScholarly Concentration Project
Journal ClubScholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1 Summer 1 Phase 1 Year 2 Phase 2 Phase 3
Health System Integration in the Context of Healthy Aging Introduction to Public Health Journal Club Scholarly Concentration Product
Journal Club Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Scholarly Concentration Project

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Population differences in the effect of aging on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
  • Integrated management of age-related co-morbidity complications associated with cardiovascular disease.
  • Efficacy of Health Systems Integration approach on the management of complex patient populations including acute stroke patients in a Comprehensive Stroke Center. Patients with high usage rates of ER, opioid addiction, etc.
  • Tele-stroke physician video consults for acute stroke management of 25 regional hospitals
  • Integrative fall prevention in the aging population
  • Patient-centered management of polypharmacy in the aged patient
  • Aged population compliance issues in preventive health care
  • Integrative care of the neurodegenerative disease patient
  • Impact of socioeconomic factors and policies in elder care
  • Outcomes of a structured interdisciplinary intervention in physical competence and psychosocial health of the aging population
  • Aging and its impact on health policies and society
Concentration Co-Directors Contact Information

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Leslie Hoffman, PhD
Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology

Robert Sweazey, PhD
Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology


Human Sexuality and Health

Home Campus: Bloomington

Overview

The Human Sexuality and Health Scholarly Concentration introduces students to a range of issues related to sex, gender and sexuality and how these characteristics intersect with the practice of medicine. Topics include: sex and gender development and diversity; sexuality and sexual fluidity; sexual and romantic relationships; contraception and reproduction; STls and HIV prevention; etc. Students learn about health discrepancies in LGBTQ+ populations, the need for competency in practice with LGBTQ+ patients, and current best practices. This Concentration is a partnership with the Kinsey Institute and provides students the opportunity to tour labs and work with faculty researchers on a range of topics related to sex and sexuality.

Locations and Availability

There are 4 slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

Students will participate onsite in Bloomington; completion of the scholarly project could be done remotely.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Human Sexuality and Health concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in a range of issues related to sex, gender and sexuality as they relate to the practice of medicine that will be vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Human SexualityFundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Critical Issues in Sexuality and HealthScholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2 Phase 2 Phase 3
Introduction to Human Sexuality
Critical Issues in Sexuality and Health
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship Course (Online)
Scholarly Concentration ProjectScholarly Concentration Project
Complete Scholarly Product

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Reproduction and sexuality, postpartum depression, birth interventions, and oxytocinHealth administration
  • Romantic and sexual relationshipsJail assessment of routine HIV/HCV testing
  • Condom use, misuse and errorsHealth equity
  • Sexual and gender development
  • Human sexuality education
  • Sexual trauma, physical health and psychological well-being
Concentration Co-Directors

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Charles Rudick, PhD
Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine

Justin Garcia, PhD
Acting Director, Kinsey Institute, Associate Research Scientist, Ruth N. Halls Associate Professor of Gender Studies


Medical Humanities

Home Campus: Statewide (based in Indianapolis)

Overview

This concentration offers an interdisciplinary course of study drawn from the Liberal Arts. The field of Medical Humanities provides medical students with qualitative humanistic and socio-cultural perspectives on health care. Students will study more comprehensively, and in-depth, the social, cultural, and humanistic determinants and consequences of health, disease and healing from literary, historical and bioethical perspectives. This is a collaboration with the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, which will serve as the primary integration site for student work.

Locations and Availability

There are 15 slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

While topic-specific classes will take place on the Indianapolis campus, students from other campuses may take the concentration courses via Zoom with approval from the co-directors. Project locations may vary.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Medical Humanities concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in the humanities as it relates to health and medicine that will be vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Medical Humanities: Perspectives on Health, Disease and HealingFundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Medicine and the Humanities: Examining the Human ConditionScholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Medical Humanities: Perspectives on Health, Disease and Healing
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Medicine and the Humanities: Examining the Human Condition
Scholarly Concentration Project Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Narrative Medicine
  • Clinical and Narrative Ethics, Intersection of Ethics & Law
  • History of Medicine
  • Clinician-patient communication, The ethics of prognostication, Ethics & oncology
  • Bioethics and Policy and Research Ethics
  • Radiology, Literature and Medicine, PhilanthropyFlu shot access to homeless populations
  • Medical SociologyHealth policy
  • Literature and Medicine
  • Radiology, Fetal Imaging, Philosophy
  • Medical Anthropology and Linguistics, Genomic Medicine and Ethics
  • Playwriting and Medical Ethics
  • Patient-provider interaction, communication skills training/interventions and digital/mediated technology
Concentration Co-Directors

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Emily Beckman, DMH
Director, Assistant Professor, Medical Humanities and Health Studies, Adjunct Assistant Professor, IU School of Medicine

Jane Hartsock, JD, MA
Director of Clinical Ethics, IU Health, Faculty, Medical Humanities and Health Studies


Public Health

Home Campus: Statewide (based in Indianapolis)

Overview

This scholarly concentration provides foundational knowledge in public health including:

  • An understanding of the U.S. health system
  • Trends impacting public health
  • Causes of death and disability
  • Historical contributions of public health to life expectancy and quality of life
  • Key terms and concepts
  • Health system organization
  • Local and global factors that determine health at a population level
  • Evidence-based interventions and evaluations
Locations and Availability

There are 20 slots available to students for this concentration during the 2019 application cycle.

All concentration coursework can be completed online.

The scholarly project work occurs in Indianapolis or a mutually agreed upon site.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Public Health concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in public health that will be vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Public HealthFundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Population Health for CliniciansScholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Public Health
Population Health for Clinicians
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include but are not limited to:

  • Clinical preventative services
  • Health administration
  • Disease control and prevention
  • Jail assessment of routine HIV/HCV testing
  • Flu shot access to homeless populations
  • Health equity
  • Health policy
  • How organizational strategies impact critical performance measures, including health quality outcomes and financial performance
  • Health information exchange
Concentration Co-Directors

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Paul Halverson, DrPH, MHSA
Professor, Founding Dean, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health

Maureen Harrington, PhD  Associate Dean for Medical Student Education, Foundational Sciences



Quality and Innovation in Health Care

Home Campus: Evansville

Overview

This program trains future clinicians to improve the quality of healthcare in a collaborative community setting. Students implement and assess healthcare solutions in the real world, leveraging Evansville’s four-hospital consortium, local health department and new Simulation Center. Students also collaborate with various healthcare professionals to complete team-based, project-oriented courses. Through completion of coursework and a scholarly project in quality improvement, students earn Lean Six Sigma Green Belt certification.

Locations and Availability

There are 20 slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

All coursework (except the online Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship course) takes place in Evansville.

The scholarly project work occurs in Evansville.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Quality and Innovation in Health Care concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in health care quality and innovation that is vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Healthcare Innovation and ImplementationFundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Lean Six Sigma for Healthcare ProfessionalsScholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Healthcare Innovation and Implementation
Lean Six Sigma for Healthcare Professionals
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Readmission rates for hip and knee replacements
  • 30-day mortality rates following a stroke
  • Bed turnaround time
  • Medication reconciliation
  • Emergency department discharge-to-door time
  • Obesity counseling efficacy
  • Opioid addiction
  • Infant mortality
Concentration Co-Directors

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Kara Garcia, PhD, MEng
Visiting Assistant Research Professor, IU School of Medicine-Evansville

Kristin La Fortune, MD
Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, IU School of Medicine-Evansville


Rural Health

Home Campus: Terre Haute

Overview

This concentration offers students an opportunity to learn and engage with rural communities through public health research. The didactic coursework teaches students about community and behavior public health issues and methods, preparing students for their Scholarly Concentration research project. The coursework and project are designed to prepare medical students for engaging with unique health issues faced by rural populations.

Locations and Availability

There are six slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

All concentration requirements can be completed online.

The scholarly project work occurs in Terre Haute.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Rural Health concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in public health with a focus on rural health that is vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product. The journal club provides a platform for students to have longitudinal discussions about concentration-related topics with a cohort of students and faculty.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Public HealthFundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Introduction to Rural and Agricultural HealthScholarly Concentration Project
Rural Health Journal ClubScholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Public Health
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Rural Health Journal Club
Introduction to Rural and Agricultural Health
Scholarly Concentration ProjectScholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Rural patients’ perception of local health care quality
  • Analysis of factors impacting rural patient elective orthopedic surgery location choice
  • Comparing cardiovascular risk perception in urban and rural family medicine clinics
  • Barriers to adherence of recommended plan of care in diagnosis of diabetes in a rural setting
  • Barriers to hepatitis vaccination in rural Indiana
Concentration Co-Directors

Students should reach out to co-directors with any questions about this concentration.

Robin Danek, MPH
Rural Medical Education Program Manager

Ellen Ireland, PhD, MPH
Visiting Lecturer


Urban Medicine and Health Care Disparities

Home Campus: Northwest-Gary

Overview

This concentration provides students with an understanding of the historical and contemporary barriers that exist for the nation’s medically underserved in urban areas. Through coursework, students will investigate authentic cross-cultural and linguistic issues in health care and be able to demonstrate how sensitivity to such issues improves health care for all. Through scholarly project work, students will act as advocates by developing interventions to address or reduce health disparities.

Locations and Availability

There are 10 slots available to students for this concentration during the 2020 application cycle.

Some concentration coursework can be completed online; some coursework takes place on the Northwest-Gary campus.

The scholarly project work occurs on the Northwest-Gary campus.

Curriculum and Timeline

Students completing the Urban Medicine and Health Care Disparities concentration fulfill the same core curriculum as students in other concentrations. The didactic components provide a strong academic and experiential foundation in urban medicine and health care disparities that is vital for completion of the core curriculum project and product.

Topic-Specific CoursesCore Curriculum
Introduction to Public HealthFundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Healthcare Disparities in an Urban SettingScholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Sample Timeline

Phase 1 Year 1Summer 1Phase 1 Year 2Phase 2Phase 3
Introduction to Public Health
Fundamentals of Research and Scholarship
Healthcare Disparities in an Urban Setting
Scholarly Concentration Project
Scholarly Concentration Product

Actual student journeys may vary; students determine if a concentration pathway will fit in their schedule by contacting concentration co-directors.

Scholarly Project Topic Examples

Students work with faculty to complete a project in a relevant topic of interest. Potential project topics include but are not limited to:

  • Access to health services
  • Enhancing community-based services at federally-qualified health centers
  • Adolescent health outcomes
  • Access to preventative health services
  • Value of community health workers and promotion of health education
  • Role of nutrition education
  • Factors in racial gaps in infant mortality
  • Substance abuse case studies in underserved populations
  • Tobacco use within minority populations
  • Substance abuse reduction
Concentration Co-Directors

Amy Han, PhD
Director of Clinical Education, IU School of Medicine-Northwest-Gary

Elizabeth Ryan, EdD
Associate Dean and Director, IU School of Medicine-Northwest-Gary